Conscious by Chloé

Chloé Lepeltier - Conscious By Chloé

Bonjour & Welcome! Conscious by Chloé is a Sustainable Lifestyle Blog focusing on Zero Waste, Slow Living, and Ethical Fashion.

A Complete List of the World's Best Zero Waste Bloggers

A Complete List of the World's Best Zero Waste Bloggers by Conscious by Chloé

I don't know about you, but I love to follow bloggers from my own city. I like being able to identify familiar places and be informed of what's happening around me.

But I'm also curious to know how people live on other corners of the planet and I'm always on the hunt for entertaining ways to practice my second and third languages.

And of course, since I'm a member of the zero waste community, I want to showcase the work that my fellow bloggers, YouZubers and Instagramers put into the world.

That's why I've compiled the following list and created the following map of the world's best zero waste content creators around the world.

I hope you'll find new or familiar sources of inspiration for your journey to sustainability.

Africa

Dubai

South Africa

America (North)

Canada

In English

In French

USA

America (South)

Brazil

Asia

China

Japan

India

Indonesia

Europe

Austria

Denmark

Finland

France

Germany

Ireland

The Netherlands

Switzerland

Ukraine

UK

Oceania

Australia

New Zealand


Don't hesitate to share your favorite zero waste blogs in the comments and I'll update the map regularly. Thank you!

Photo by Raw Pixel.

Zero Waste Period

Zero Waste Period by Jola Kokoszka for Conscious by Chloé

Periods are a private and delicate subject and I'm usually not one to share intimate details publicly.

But since feminine hygiene can be an important source of waste (and social injustice), I thought I'd share my insights on the subject.

First, let's have a look at the various options available:

  • Menstrual cups A small, flexible cup that is worn internally and sits low in the vaginal canal, collecting rather than absorbing menstrual flow.

  • Reusable Pads or Liners Similar to "regular" pads or liners, they usually have wings that fasten around the underwear (some feature a removable insert made from absorbent material).

  • Period Panties These look like regular underwear, except that they can absorb a day's worth of menstrual blood.

The last two can be used as back up for menstrual cups or (organic) tampons or to completely replace disposable feminine hygiene products.

  • Free / instinctive bleeding I do not know whether this is a hoax or just the latest woo-woo trend, but I just wanted to put this here. Has any of you heard of it? It consists of learning to know your body, to control it and then let yourself bleed freely when you go to the toilet...

Why I chose the menstrual cup

I first heard of menstrual cups close to 15 years ago when I was working as a hostess during my studies. One of the girls on my team was actually the first menstrual cup salesperson in Switzerland and introduced us to this new product. Most of us were grossed out and I never heard of the menstrual cup for the next 10 years, until I finally decided to make the switch close to 5 years ago!

As far as periods go, I've always been an advocate of the less is more approach. My mom and I went to the supermarket on the first day of my period and got all the options available. Ultimately, I decided that I wanted one product for any type of situation (swimming, sleeping, camping, traveling). Pads were too uncomfortable and bulky, swimming) and tampons with applicators took too much space in my bag. I've never really been introduced to any other product so my choice was easy: tampons. No applicator, no liner.

Everything went smoothly and I would have never had to change my routine until the eco-activist living in my head told me it was time to rethink this aspect of my life.

I remember the day I purchased my menstrual cup. Octave was actually there with me. I was visiting him (or had just moved in with him, I'm not really sure). We had not been together for very long time and I felt a little weird telling him I had to stop by the pharmacy to "get something". I remember him asking what it was, and ultimately decided to tell him about menstrual cups.

Zero Waste Period & Menstrual Cup by Conscious by Chloé

My experience with a menstrual cup

Having used tampons without applicators for many years, I had no apprehension to insert the cup and got the hang of it pretty quickly (fold and insert).

After 4+ years of using the cup, I can report that I've never felt freer. Here are a couple reasons why I love my cup.

  • It's zero waste. Duh! This is good for me, good for the environment, good for future generations (Am I exaggerating?). Oh and it's convenient for when I go hiking and camping (no bloody trash bag to haul back to the nearest trash container). I just carry a squirt bottle to rinse it and clean up.
  • It's inexpensive and saves me money. Considering I got mine more than 4 years ago and have not spent one dollar on feminine hygiene products ever since, you do the math!
  • It's discrete. I remember looking for my badge in my pocket as I was approaching my office building one day and heard something else fall on the floor. Yep, a tampon. I'm pretty sure none of my coworkers who were standing outside smoking a cigarette (boo!) saw it, but I did blush for a second. The only time I have to carry the cup with me is when I travel and know I'm gonna have my period. It usually comes in a small fabric pouch, very cute!
  • It's comfortable. Is it just me or have you ever felt your tampon inside of you when you were sitting (a little TMI, but I'm pretty sure some of you know what I mean). Well, this never happened with a cup, it's lightweight, it's flexible. You pretty much put it in place and forget it's even there. Cups usually come with a stem at the bottom. Keep it as is for the first couple days you use your cup, as the stem makes it easier to remove the cup. But know that you can trim this stem. I personally totally trimmed mine as the stem was a source of irritation.
  • It's efficient. The only accidents that happened with my cup are pretty recent. And now that I'm writing this article and doing a little research, I just realize that it might be time to retire my first cup and get a new one.
  • It's easy to use. You might want to lock the door of a clean and well-lit bathroom with easy access to a sink the first couple time you use a cup and practice insertion and removal. After a couple times, you'll become an expert and master the single-handed gesture (or not, this is not a competition). Personal tip, we recently installed a bidet on our toilet. I love that it helps me feel extra fresh during that time of the month.
  • It's easy to clean and maintain. I usually empty my cup 3 times a day according to my flow (morning, noon, evening). I simply empty and rinse it during the day and clean it with soap once a day when I'm in the shower. At the end of my cycle, I scrub it with baking soda (check the manufacturer's cleaning recommendations) and a dedicated brush (an old bamboo toothbrush), clean the suction holes with a dedicated toothpick, boil it in water, dry it completely and store it in its pouch until the next month.
  • It makes periods real. Ads want to make you believe that menstrual blood is either gross (it should never be seen) or nonexistent (or turquoise blue). But it's a great indicator of your health and of how your body works and should not be disregarded. I love to be able to see and "study" it. What shade of red is it, what's the texture like, is it abundant? Of course, you can also just dump the content of your cup in the toilet and never have to look at it.

A couple more things

Feminine hygiene is definitely a very personal subject. There is no right or wrong way to take care of yourself during this time of the month.

Just know that some of us are lucky enough to have that many options to chose from and be aware that many brands actually donate a portion of their proceeds to women who are not as lucky as us.

I compiled a little selection here.

Do you have any questions on menstrual cups? Feel free to ask me anything! I'll be happy to share a little more about my experience.

Picture by Jola Kokoszka for Conscious by Chloé. This post is not sponsored but when you shop via some of the links above I may make a small commission from a sale. Thanks for supporting the brands that support Conscious by Chloé!

My Favorite Local Second Hand Resources

Vintage Shopping for Conscious by Chloé

As you can see on the above picture, our house is a work in progress. Wires hanging here and there, sofa cushions waiting to be upholstered and other DIYs and purchases that we have not yet agreed on.

Octave knows that every time he leaves the house for a couple days he'll find it in a totally different state as I love to rearrange things around the house (things have moved quite a bit since he took this picture).

There aren't many things we brought with us from Switzerland when we moved to the US except for small tables and art, mostly.

The rest of our home decor consists of items we found at flea markets, garage sales, second hand shops, and some we made ourselves.

There are of course a couple new items we were in a rush to get when we found a place to live/work, but for the most part, we were naturally drawn to gently used items.

Here are my favorite resources, for home decor and more:

  • Buy Nothing - Find your local group on the website and join it on Facebook, then browse through the dozens of pictures of items your neighbors are parting with, express your interest and go pick them up.

Other neighborhood social networks like Rooster and Nextdoor also have "classified" and "free items" sections.

  • Instagram - Some people create specific accounts to sell items via Instagram, and others randomly organize garage sales and you're lucky enough to live close by. This is what happened to me last winter. I had been following Liz's Insta for a while and suddenly realized that she was selling her army cot for peanuts. I jumped on the occasion and brought back an extra bed for our guests. She later organized a big garage sale when she emptied her house and left for a big road trip in her Winnebaggo and I scored a couple more items, including the most crooked cactus.

Look for local interior designers on Insta and keep a close eye on their Insta stories, you never know when they're gonna realize that they might be hoarding and decide to host a small or big sale!

  • Craigslist - Is it really worth mentioning why Craigslist is an awesome second hand resource. Our best score was a fridge. Octave noticed the ad, and even though there was no picture and the price was too low to be good, he felt like this was no scam. He was right! The older couple just did not want to bother taking and uploading a picture. We came back home with a close to new KitchenAid fridge for less than $100!

I usually look for specific items but am more and more on the lookout for estate and garage sale dates and times. I'm gonna start getting up earlier and earlier on week-ends to catch the best items.

And a list of my favorite resources for second hand treasures in Portland:

You can find more gems in the "Shop Second Hand" section of my Zero Waste City Guide.


What your best second hand score? Where and how did you find it?

Picture by Octave Zangs for Conscious by Chloé.

Zero Waste On The Go

Zero Waste On The Go by Conscious by Chloé

I've been showing what's in my to go bag a lot on Insta Stories lately and got many questions about my Zero Waste tips on the go.

So here's what's in my to-go bag at all times:

  • a napkin: you've now seen this one everywhere, I made it during a shibori dyeing class a couple summers ago. I use it as a napkin at restaurants, as a handkerchief, to dry my hands at the restroom, to pack my croissant furoshiki-style at the bakery on Sunday mornings (not at all the same time).

  • a muslin bag: my mother in law sewed a bunch of these for me for Christmas, but the one I use the most is a dust bag I got from a local shop. I bring it to the bakery to put my croissant in, or fill it with trail mix when I go for a hike.

  • stainless steel straws (regular and fat): for juice or bubble tea.

  • stainless steel chopsticks: I got mine for free through my local Buy Nothing chapter. They are pretty heavy but do the job. I take them with me in order to avoid using the non reusable ones wrapped in paper you usually find at sushi restaurants.

  • mason jars: of various sizes, for various uses, from coffee mug to leftovers container.

  • a drink top: to put on my mason jar and drink my chai tea without spilling it.

  • a stainless steel box: to put leftovers in at restaurants.

That's a lot of items, but I like to be ready for any scenario. I usually leave the bag in my car and just grab whatever I need before getting off. I guess you can do the same, or, just be a little more organized than I am and plan for the day before leaving on your bike or to take the bus/tram/metro.

Also, weight is no issue for me, because I mostly walk short distances or drive. But most of these items can be found in lighter versions (like bamboo or titanium chopsticks). A bamboo utensil kit is also pretty lightweight and durable, I'd recommend starting here.

What's one thing you always carry with you to prevent waste?


You might also be interested in my Zero Waste Shopping Kit article and 3 Ways to Kickstart your Journey to Less Waste.

You can find most on these items mentioned in this post in the Conscious by Chloé Shop.